Public Service Post: Cool It!

Here’s a public service post for everybody on the East Coast of the US, who began their sweltering-in-earnest today and will live in heat and humidity through at least Friday —

The temperature in Haydenville, just down the road, reached 99.8 Fahrenheit this afternoon, and outside our kitchen, the thermometer stands at 97 degrees. It may be the first day of summer, but this is excessive. Are you listening, Mother Nature?

Anyway, to remind you that the seasons roll inexorably past, that what was hot was once cold and will be again, and maybe just to refresh your eyes with the equivalent of a tall iced drink, here are some remembrances of snowfalls past, beginning with the Hallowe’en Blizzard of 2011:

and then there was the winter of 2010-11:

and the cold that froze solid and seemed it would never relent:

Are you shivering yet? Keep looking, fan yourself and chill out, everybody!

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This entry was posted in Etcetera, Memory, Nature, Photography, winter and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

44 Responses to Public Service Post: Cool It!

  1. Love it! These are really beautiful photos with a timely message!

    Like

  2. magsx2 says:

    Hi,
    Really gorgeous photos, I just love the last photo the red flowers in the front just adds to the magic of it all. 🙂
    It is amazing how quick the seasons seem to change, we are into our Winter now. 🙂

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      I’ve wondered for a long time, Does any part of Australia get snow in winter? I guess I could Google it, but your comment just made me think about that again. I know you get mighty hot in summer!
      (Just to add, I love your posts about unusual Australian creatures like the kookaburra.)

      Like

      • magsx2 says:

        Yes it does snow in Winter in the Southern States of Australia only.
        It doesn’t snow where I live which is known as part of the tropics, I have never seen snow only on mountain peaks in the distance when o/seas, we always travel to places when they are in Summer, I don’t know if I would be able to handle the cold. 😀

        Like

  3. send some heat our way, right now! I promise to send snow later this year!!

    Like

  4. It been OH-PRESS-IVE here in jersey. Thanks for the cool wishes. 🙂

    Like

  5. reb says:

    Oh, what wonderful photos! I’m one of them who love snow [not sports]. Right now, the temperatures outside are rather pleasant here. In the apartment is another story. Quebec and Ontario are experiencing a severe heat-wave right now, with all kinds of warnings … Toronto sounds terrible!

    I hope we won’t get your weather. We have two fans going on this room right now, and it’s alright because the humidity isn’t very high.

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      Quebec and Ontario are subject to our Great Northeast Heat Wave, and Toronto weather is Midwest American, which is to say — BAD. Hotter than hot, stormier than stormy, and in the winter — colder than cold.

      While I was checking out Canadian geography for Joss (to send some heat her way) I looked for Saint John and found it, not so far from Maine after all! But outside of knowing that you get a lot of fog (from your posts), I’m not sure if you swelter or shiver most of the time!

      Like

      • reb says:

        After I read your post I went out on the balcony to get some fresh air. Was surprised to find that the temp had gone way up in a few hours! It’s 23C now at midnight. It gets pretty bad [hot] here in the summer … uncomfortably hot due to the constant humidity. I dread this time of year.

        Like

  6. Hmm, I’m looking out my window right now onto a cold, very grey, drizzly London. I could send you some pics of that to cool you down, but they would be nowhere near as pretty as your snow pics! Would love to have just a bit of your heat over here!

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      Be careful what you wish for, as the old saying has it.
      Our weather has been known to head east sometimes, arriving chez toi in five days or so (just like an ocean liner).
      Dunno if I hope so for you or not! It’s wicked hot — although cold, very grey and drizzly isn’t much more tempting —
      😦

      Like

  7. Madhu says:

    I can’t stand the cold either, not unsurprisingly 🙂 That last photo is gorgeous.

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      I guess my complaints about the heat here have a hollow ring for anyone living in India!
      The icicles look good, but oh, do I remember that interminable cold.
      Too hot, too cold —maybe traveling — like you love so much and do so much — is the answer!

      Like

  8. cocomino says:

    I don’t experience such snow but there are also some areas in Japan where it snows a lot like this. Please take care.

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      We know a young family who live in Hokkaido. So many of the photos of their children look like these! But they do lots of sports and things in the snow and seem to like it.
      We will be very careful, for old people such heat is a little bit dangerous, so we stay inside with the A/C on — and think cool thoughts. 😉

      Like

  9. Ahhhhhh. Thank you. 🙂

    I’m posting this for my friends on facebook.

    Like

  10. Patti Kuche says:

    Scorching words from you Judith beautifully tempered with those wonderful shots! I feel for you in that awful sweltering heat and hope it cools down for you all soon. I send you greetings from the UK where it is cold, wet and dreary but soon we shall be warming ourselves by the fire with wine and spirits. A little compromise on both sides of the pond would surely go a long way!

    Like

  11. Smallpeace says:

    Temperatures like these are nature’s way of telling us to “cool our jets” and live slow. Think of it as a free Bikram yoga class…all day long!

    Like

  12. Mercy says:

    Judy – this turned out to be a great memory exercise – I had the vaguest but vaguest of memories of a Shakespeare quote on this very subject (with him, I imagine, you can find a quote on almost any subject!) – and I couldn’t for the life of me remember where it could have been from – so with some sleuthing (a story by itself I suppose) I actually tracked it down!! it was Richard II – though the speaker (Bullingbroke) didn’t quite agree with you, a minor matter for Shakespeare himself might have differed?

    Bul: Oh who can hold a fire in his hand
    By thinking on the frostie Caucasus?
    Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite,
    By bare imagination of a Feast?
    Or Wallow naked in December snow
    By thinking on fantasticke summers heate?
    Oh no, the apprehension of the good
    Giues but the greater feeling to the worse:
    Fell sorrowes tooth, doth euer ranckle more
    Then when it bites, but lanceth not the sore

    King Richard II. ACT I Scene 3.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/2250/pg2250.html

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      Woo hoo!
      At a single stroke/comment, Mercy, you’ve lifted this blog up into rarefied intellectual spheres!
      I’m thrilled and grateful for this touch of class 😉

      What a memory you have, not to mention research skills.
      Shakespeare did talk about everything under the sun — sometimes contradicting himself even more than the Bible does.
      So maybe he (personally) might have agreed that a vision of the frosty Caucasus could work as a temporary antidote to the burning fire of the last couple of days? Thank you, as always.

      Like

      • Mercy says:

        And thank you Judy for providing that prompt – for I do think the memory cells need a little exercise like this once in a while if they are to go the distance with me – I dont want to outlive my memory cells 🙂
        I suppose the contradictions were because he had to speak through the voices of so many different speakers – the sonnets probably were his own commentary – not sure if he wrote any thing else in his own voice..

        Like

        • Touch2Touch says:

          Even the sonnets have a kind of dramatic quality, IMHO — so even there he may be putting on a persona, however close it might be to his own.
          Who knows? I guess that’s part of his fascination, how little we really know of such a protean genius.

          Like

  13. Mercy says:

    Ah.. but the dramatic quality may be because in the old days people always spoke dramatically or more likely formally? very rarely bared their true selves – what light-years away from today’s world with oprah’s legacy, and fb and all that’s in between!
    And I meant to ask – when did you become such an avid photographer? with an eye for such lovely camera shots? or were you always one such?

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      I think the formal love sonnet sequence was a convention —
      and maybe in the future someone will look back at our tell-all-the-more-awful-the-better memoirs and recognize them as conventions, also!

      I always took photos — just had no vehicle for displaying them. Blogs are ideal!

      Like

  14. COOL !

    Best wishes for a ‘re-freshing’ Sunday! Stay cool…..! 🙂
    xxxkarin

    Like

  15. ristinw says:

    This post has saved me from this hot and wet sunny days!!!!

    Like

  16. suitablefish says:

    90 today here in the southeast Idaho mountains! I’m feeling a cool breeze. . .
    nice pics.

    Like

    • Touch2Touch says:

      I get the impression that your weather bounces up and down, can be really hot, can be really cold?
      Southeast Idaho seems as far off and exotic to me as the Far East would be, or Africa.
      Doesn’t speak too well about my knowledge of geography and vast areas of my own United States, alas.
      Your posts are a delightful way of learning something —-

      Like

  17. Ahhhh, love that photo of the snow! It’s hot, hot, hot over here too and with the humidity, I’m dreaming of a winter wonderland again.

    Like

  18. Aw…. very beautiful pictures! 🙂

    Like

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